1. My 
dollymods:

Seventeen Magazine, 1970s


Oh my god, yes please

dollymods:

Seventeen Magazine, 1970s

Oh my god, yes please

thepieshops:

I want to live and die in this room.


This is amazing

thepieshops:

I want to live and die in this room.

This is amazing

vintageandretrointeriors:

(via LILEKS (James) :: Interior Desecrators)

Amazing shapes and colours!
aqqindex:

William Leavitt, Manta Ray, 1981

aqqindex:

William Leavitt, Manta Ray, 1981

bobofeed:

Japanese retaining wall
"Sometimes I go about in pity for myself, and all the while, a great wind carries me across the sky" - Ojibwe saying

"Sometimes I go about in pity for myself, and all the while, a great wind carries me across the sky" - Ojibwe saying

thebuyblog:

Honestly, I have no idea where you get these… Just go on Ebay. 

Some other beds here: http://freshome.com/2008/03/18/16-of-the-most-extreme-modern-beds-youll-ever-see/

interior-design-home:

Colorful stairs

interior-design-home:

Colorful stairs

saffity:

Amazing Women in History
Nellie Bly - New York World - Blackwell’s Island Insane Asylum - 1887
Real name - Elizabeth Jane Cochran
At the age of 23, unemployed journalist, Nellie Bly, walked into the office of Joseph Pulitzer’s New York World and talked her way into a job. There she was assigned to the horrendous job of going undercover and exposing the terror and dismal existance that was occurring at Blackwell’s Island Insane Asylum.
To expose the inner workings of the asylum, she played mad. Practicing one night by making deranged faces in the mirror, she then entered the asylum for 10 days where she was examined by multiple doctors who stated she was “Positively demented, I consider it a hopeless case. She needs to be put where someone will care for her” and “Undoubtedly Insane”
Through her reported experiences, she began the motion of reform at Blackwell’s Island as well as other asylums around the country. The grand jury involved her in their own investigation, and took her opinions and suggestions seriously.
Nellie Bly is truly an amazing woman in our history.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nellie_Bly

saffity:

Amazing Women in History

Nellie Bly - New York World - Blackwell’s Island Insane Asylum - 1887

Real name - Elizabeth Jane Cochran

At the age of 23, unemployed journalist, Nellie Bly, walked into the office of Joseph Pulitzer’s New York World and talked her way into a job. There she was assigned to the horrendous job of going undercover and exposing the terror and dismal existance that was occurring at Blackwell’s Island Insane Asylum.

To expose the inner workings of the asylum, she played mad. Practicing one night by making deranged faces in the mirror, she then entered the asylum for 10 days where she was examined by multiple doctors who stated she was “Positively demented, I consider it a hopeless case. She needs to be put where someone will care for her” and “Undoubtedly Insane”

Through her reported experiences, she began the motion of reform at Blackwell’s Island as well as other asylums around the country. The grand jury involved her in their own investigation, and took her opinions and suggestions seriously.

Nellie Bly is truly an amazing woman in our history.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nellie_Bly

thereconstructionists:

Elizabeth Jane Cochrane (May 5, 1864 — January 27, 1922), better known by her pen name, Nellie Bly, was a trailblazing journalist who not only paved the way for women in media at a time when women still didn’t have the right to vote, but also also championed the power of journalism as a tool of social justice.
In 1887, writing for Joseph Pulitzer’s pioneering New York World newspaper, she went undercover and feigned insanity for an investigative story on Women’s Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell’s Island after hearing of the appalling neglect, patient abuse, and brutality taking place at the institution. She went to extraordinary lengths to enact her diagnosis, then subjected herself to insufferable indignities. The exposé she wrote led to a grand jury investigation into the practices of the asylum, on which Bly was invited to collaborate and which spurred a $850,000 increase in the Department of Public Charities and Corrections budget for treating the mentally ill.
As Matthew Goodman aptly puts it in Eighty Days: Nellie Bly and Elizabeth Bisland’s History-Making Race Around the World ,

No female reporter before her had ever seemed quite so audacious, so willing to risk personal safety in pursuit of a story.

Indeed, only two years later, in November of 1889, Bly packed a single bag and set out to circumnavigate the globe, aiming to beat Jules Verne’s fantasy journey of Eighty Days Around the World. She braved formidable weather, risked deadly illness, and returned in “seventy-two days, six hours, eleven minutes and fourteen seconds.” So remarkable was her feat that it reverberated in a radio dramatization more than two decades after Bly’s death.
Early in her career, she went around and interviewed every major newspaper editor in New York at the time — all, of course, white males — about why there were so few, if any, women in journalism. The answers ranged from the unabashedly, matter-of-factly sexist (“Accuracy,” said Charles Anderson Dana, editor of the Sun, “is the greatest gift in a journalist. … Women are generally worse than men in this regard. They find it impossible not to exaggerate.”) to the misguidedly mannered (Reverend Dr. Hepworth, editor of the Herald, pointed out that papers were mainly in the business of scandal and sensation, and “a gentleman could not in delicacy ask a woman to have anything to do with that class of news.”) Bly’s resulting essay caused a furor as arguably the first major piece on gender politics in the media world.
But perhaps most admirable of all was how indefatigably she embodied that highest journalistic ideal of integrity and passion. Bly herself articulated it best, writing in The Evening-Journal a mere nineteen days before her death:

I have never written a word that did not come from my heart. I never shall.

Learn more: Brain Pickings | Eighty Days | Wikipedia

This woman is somebody I would like to know more about, she faked being mentally ill was admitted to a mental asylum, so she could investigate how terribly patients were treated, how poor the conditions were… she lasted 10 days as a ‘patient’ which is longer than I would last without losing my mind! She raised money equivalent to millions of dollars (in this day and age) for the improvement of these hospitals. This was a time where women were looked down upon as if they were objects, they were not equal to men.. they didn’t have a right to vote, they couldn’t put their point across in conversation. This woman knew who she was and where she wanted to go, she didn’t let anyone’s view of her get in the way. She did what she believed she could do. 

thereconstructionists:

Elizabeth Jane Cochrane (May 5, 1864 — January 27, 1922), better known by her pen name, Nellie Bly, was a trailblazing journalist who not only paved the way for women in media at a time when women still didn’t have the right to vote, but also also championed the power of journalism as a tool of social justice.

In 1887, writing for Joseph Pulitzer’s pioneering New York World newspaper, she went undercover and feigned insanity for an investigative story on Women’s Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell’s Island after hearing of the appalling neglect, patient abuse, and brutality taking place at the institution. She went to extraordinary lengths to enact her diagnosis, then subjected herself to insufferable indignities. The exposé she wrote led to a grand jury investigation into the practices of the asylum, on which Bly was invited to collaborate and which spurred a $850,000 increase in the Department of Public Charities and Corrections budget for treating the mentally ill.

As Matthew Goodman aptly puts it in Eighty Days: Nellie Bly and Elizabeth Bisland’s History-Making Race Around the World ,

No female reporter before her had ever seemed quite so audacious, so willing to risk personal safety in pursuit of a story.

Indeed, only two years later, in November of 1889, Bly packed a single bag and set out to circumnavigate the globe, aiming to beat Jules Verne’s fantasy journey of Eighty Days Around the World. She braved formidable weather, risked deadly illness, and returned in “seventy-two days, six hours, eleven minutes and fourteen seconds.” So remarkable was her feat that it reverberated in a radio dramatization more than two decades after Bly’s death.

Early in her career, she went around and interviewed every major newspaper editor in New York at the time — all, of course, white males — about why there were so few, if any, women in journalism. The answers ranged from the unabashedly, matter-of-factly sexist (“Accuracy,” said Charles Anderson Dana, editor of the Sun, “is the greatest gift in a journalist. … Women are generally worse than men in this regard. They find it impossible not to exaggerate.”) to the misguidedly mannered (Reverend Dr. Hepworth, editor of the Herald, pointed out that papers were mainly in the business of scandal and sensation, and “a gentleman could not in delicacy ask a woman to have anything to do with that class of news.”) Bly’s resulting essay caused a furor as arguably the first major piece on gender politics in the media world.

But perhaps most admirable of all was how indefatigably she embodied that highest journalistic ideal of integrity and passion. Bly herself articulated it best, writing in The Evening-Journal a mere nineteen days before her death:

I have never written a word that did not come from my heart. I never shall.

This woman is somebody I would like to know more about, she faked being mentally ill was admitted to a mental asylum, so she could investigate how terribly patients were treated, how poor the conditions were… she lasted 10 days as a ‘patient’ which is longer than I would last without losing my mind! She raised money equivalent to millions of dollars (in this day and age) for the improvement of these hospitals. This was a time where women were looked down upon as if they were objects, they were not equal to men.. they didn’t have a right to vote, they couldn’t put their point across in conversation. This woman knew who she was and where she wanted to go, she didn’t let anyone’s view of her get in the way. She did what she believed she could do. 

Lol what

Lol what

harryjays:

Фотографије временске линије on We Heart It - http://weheartit.com/entry/46577530/via/Harryjay101
Hearted from: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151139340983880&set=a.10150994258678880.424420.363831013879&type=1&permPage=1

Gutsy chair